BRIT POLITICS logo
Studying, William and Kate, Royal Courts of Justice, Prime Minister David Cameron, Winston Churchill, Parliament

Scott’s Blog

Brexit Myth Three – Our national security is at risk

Monday, February 15, 2016

 

Those who wish to remain in the European Union say that it would damage our national security. With very little credible evidence given for such a position, I’m not so sure. 

It’s said that one of the reasons there is such little appetite amongst EU leaders to help our Prime Minister with his bogus and barely credible re-negotiation of our membership is the concern that the EU ship is sinking fast under the weight of the dual Eurozone and migrant crisis engulfing Europe. 

There’s no doubt that these issues pose real problems for the EU, but the idea that the UK would be abandoning Europe in its hour of need when facing this issue is just cobblers. The UK has already opted out of the Euro and the Euro bailout scheme. We have also opted out of the EU migrant policy, as we have one of our own, and out of Schengen. 

We take refugees that we have vetted from official refugee camps and not those who just turn up on the shores and beaches of southern Europe or Northern France. Taking migrants that arrive on the shores of Europe is actually contrary to our national interest and that of other European states, we know for certain ISIS terrorists are infiltrating Europe through this route along with an unknown number of criminals due to poor checks.

We can’t opt to stay because the world is a dangerous place

There is no doubt that the world is a very dangerous place at the moment, but when has it not been in our recent history? It is not the fault of the UK nor does it have anything to do with us leaving the EU that the United States has decided it wants to lead from behind in the world for the first time since the Second World War. For the last few years, America has had no appetite to confront the dangers we all face whether this is in the Middle-East which is complete mess, due in part to our own meddling over the years, or in the South China sea where China threatens and intimidates its neighbours or indeed, right here in Europe where Putin’s Russia has attempted and with limited success re-drawn Europe’s borders through military adventures. 

All these things would have occurred whether the UK was a member of the EU or not, so how it can be remotely argued that turning our backs on the EU threatens our own national security? The people of the United Kingdom should not be told they have to turn their backs on the one opportunity in the last 40 years (and the only one probably for the next 40 years) that there is to wrestle back full parliamentary sovereignty and control of their own law making, borders and judicial decisions until the world settles down a bit and these volatile issues are resolved. That’s just absurd, the world never settles down and crises come and crises go; it is the way of the world.

Being a member of major international institutions is not conditional on EU membership   

In my view, Brexit will not alter one iota UK defence and security policy. We will remain a permanent member of the UN Security Council and a leading member of NATO. We are not members of these major international organisations because we are members of the EU. We are members of these international organisations because we have a highly regarded and highly developed, military and diplomatic capability. Co-operation between the UK and France which has been developing over recent years will continue, why shouldn’t it? 

The idea that Brexit will somehow destroy a close and cosy European defence and foreign policy is again absurd. One does not exist and even if it did, co-operation can be maintained on issues of climate change, defence collaboration, intelligence gathering, fighting terrorism and organised crime without the UK being a member of the EU. We manage such close relationships with other countries that are not members of the EU.

Would Brexit really trouble the United States? 

The United States, for its own political convenience, would prefer the UK to remain within the EU. It was the United States who after all, set up and funded the EU in its infancy as the European Coal and Steel Community and with the Marshall Plan across Western Europe. But would Brexit really trouble the United States, threaten our Atlantic alliance and thus our national security with our closest ally?  Not a chance. If the American’s are anything at all, they are pragmatists. They would come to terms with Brexit very quickly and it would be business as usual. 

The American’s know that there is one difference between the UK and the rest of the EU, reliability, and they would be doing their utmost to ensure our alliance continues and strengthens despite the anti-Brexit rhetoric that might be coming from the weakest White House and State Department in living memory.

The Choice Ahead

So do I think Brexit would be a good thing? You may have gathered by now, that yes I do. 

I make a plea to the people of the United Kingdom that Brexit will see our country as a free, independent trading nation in control of our own borders our courts. Crucially, our Parliament, made up of the people we elect and can remove, would be sovereign again. 

As a result of Brexit, Britain would prosper economically and the European Union would be forced into a fundamental re-think and meaningful reform would have to follow. The EU model of the 1950s and the post-war vision have had its day. It is an out-dated idea, the world and Europe has moved on and it is high time our political class and that in Europe realised it before a third disaster in less than 125 years is visited upon the continent once again. 

Comments

Post has no comments.
Post a Comment





Captcha Image




Best Sellers


  • DID YOU KNOW? Olivia Coleman is set to play Queen Elizabeth II in future Netflix series of The Crown.  


Latest News & Features


The theme for this month is Kings. 

Probably the most famous of all, we start with Henry VIII

Remember when Windsor Castle caught fire in November 1992? BRIT Review reminds you how it unfolded

The First World War: Your Guide to The Battle of Cambrai, last major offensive of 1917

NEW Case Study: The history and purpose of The Budget

Our Twitter Feed

Recent Posts

Tags

Archive