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Introduction
What are Parties for
How Parties have Adapted to Change - Cadre Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Mass Membership Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Catch-All Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Cartel Party
Describing Party Systems
Theories of Party Systems -The Frozen Party System
Theories of Party Systems - The Downs Model
Theories of Party Systems - Satori
The New Party System
How do voters decide who to vote for
How do voters decide who to vote for - The Michigan Studies
How do voters decide who to vote for - Social Class
How do voters decide who to vote for - Partisan Dealignment
Issue Voting
Single Member Constituencies
Electoral Bias
Electoral Geography of Great Britain
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Conservatives
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Labour
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Liberals
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Plaid Cymru
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - SNP
Electoral Geography in Great Britain - UKIP
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Green Party
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Respect
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - BNP
General Election Campaign - Choosing the Date
General Election Campaign
General Election Campaign - The Media
General Election Campaigns - Three types of Media
General Election Campaigns - Opinion Polls
General Election Campaigns - turn-out
Why did people vote the way they did - Social Class
Why did people vote the way they did - Housing Tenure
Why did people vote the way they did - Age
Why did people vote the way they did - Gender
Why did people vote the way they did - Ethnicity
The result and government formation
Introduction
What are Parties for
How Parties have Adapted to Change - Cadre Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Mass Membership Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Catch-All Party
How Parties Have Adapted to Change - The Cartel Party
Describing Party Systems
Theories of Party Systems -The Frozen Party System
Theories of Party Systems - The Downs Model
Theories of Party Systems - Satori
The New Party System
How do voters decide who to vote for
How do voters decide who to vote for - The Michigan Studies
How do voters decide who to vote for - Social Class
How do voters decide who to vote for - Partisan Dealignment
Issue Voting
Single Member Constituencies
Electoral Bias
Electoral Geography of Great Britain
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Conservatives
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Labour
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Liberals
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Plaid Cymru
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - SNP
Electoral Geography in Great Britain - UKIP
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Green Party
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - Respect
Electoral Geography of Great Britain - BNP
General Election Campaign - Choosing the Date
General Election Campaign
General Election Campaign - The Media
General Election Campaigns - Three types of Media
General Election Campaigns - Opinion Polls
General Election Campaigns - turn-out
Why did people vote the way they did - Social Class
Why did people vote the way they did - Housing Tenure
Why did people vote the way they did - Age
Why did people vote the way they did - Gender
Why did people vote the way they did - Ethnicity
The result and government formation
parties and voting banner

University 18 Yrs + | Parties and Voting

The UK Labour Party


Labour in 1950 won working class and many mixed urban seats and all industrial and mining seats, but also performed well in many rural seats, especially in Norfolk where it had three MPs. Its changes since are a mirror image of the Conservatives.

It lost most mixed seats in the 1950s to the Conservatives but won them back in 1964 and in 1966 made inroads into some suburban areas and medium sized cities such as Cambridge and Exeter and the Government sponsored New Towns in the SE such as Harlow and Basildon. 

It weakened considerably in rural areas in 1970 and lost mixed industrial/suburban areas, the New Towns and even some industrial constituencies to the Conservatives in 1979 and 1983. In contrast, apart from the SNP successes in 1974, it gradually became the dominant party in Scotland.

In 1997, Labour achieved its highest ever number of seats with gains in all types of seats. It lost seats in 2005 and 2010, especially in the South and Midlands, but is performing better than in the 1980s in Scotland, London and the North. 

Tony Blair did not believe his election team in 1997 when they said that Labour had won Hove and many of these seaside constituencies are now marginals when they were safe Conservative in the 1980s.

Although Labour took Corby, Northamptonshire, from the Conservatives in 2012, they have had to campaign hard against the UKIP surge. UKIP has seen increasing support coming from the Labour Party's 'core' vote many of whom went against the 'Labour line' on the European Union referendum to remain in the EU.

In 2014 there were only 617 votes separating The Labour Party and UKIP when the votes had been counted in the Heywood and Middleton by-election. This should have been an easy win in a Labour heartland. At the 2015 General Election UKIP failed to take any seats from Labour but came close second places in several areas. In 2015 Ed Miliband resigned as Leader of the Labour Party with some fearing that not only had he not appealed to voters but that he had taken the party too far to the left and away from electoral success. Miliband was replaced by Jeremy Corbyn, a man even further to the left of the party, who has been dogged by shadow cabinet resignations, open public defiance and challenges to his leadership. This will have a major impact for Labour at the next General Election as too whether its core traditional vote stays with them.
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