Brexit: the case for a new referendum by Jorn Moeskops

Why are we so predisposed against a new referendum? People from around the UK have echoed the view that another referendum would be a betrayal against the will of the people.  But let us go back in the past and deconstruct this argument for a minute. David Cameron, then Prime Minister of the UK, pledged…

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Quick Guide to the 1975 European Referendum

In 1975 the UK held a referendum on its membership of the European Economic Community (also known as the Common Market). The referendum, across the UK, was the country’s first nationwide referendum. Why was it held? Britain under Prime Minister Edward Heath had joined the EEC in January 1973 when the Treaty of Rome was…

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Brexit and the General Election: How it affects Millennials by Jadesola Fakoya

This article sets out how Brexit will affect people in the UK, under 40, shown through the prism of the legal realities Brexit brings and what is set out in the main parties manifestos. The Legal Realities and Issues of Brexit The United Kingdom triggered Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union (TEU),…

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May bangs the war drum in bid to rally the masses, but will her gamble work? by Max Quarterman

Theresa May’s aggressive stance towards the Brexit negotiation of recent weeks has demonstrated a willingness of the Conservative party to follow an age-old tactic, war wins’ votes. However, their one-dimensional approach thus far demonstrates something particularly worrying, the appetite of this government for putting the future of the UK at risk for short term political…

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Scottish Conservatism: Stoking the Constitutional Fire by Jon Adamson

I attended one of the counts for the Scottish Parliamentary Elections in 2016 where, not uncommonly, I witnessed the Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP) holding onto one of their seats with a stable majority. However, what was not common that evening was seeing the Conservative candidate’s vote share increase so much that she leapt to second…

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How Brexit Became More Important Than Governing by Jonathan McNiven

In recent years, voters have been more concerned with a political party’s capacity to govern rather than the issues of the day. The large class divide which pitted working class Labour voters against the more affluent Conservative vote belongs to another era. The success of both Tony Blair and David Cameron was largely based on…

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How tough is Prime Minister Theresa May?

Already serving as Home Secretary, Mrs May became Leader of the Conservative Party and therefore Prime Minister on 13 July 2016. The leadership race was triggered by the resignation of David Cameron after the UK voted to leave the European Union. During this time Mrs. May stayed largely out of the campaign. She delivered one…

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Time to say goodbye to George Osborne

Former Chancellor George Osborne announced he would not seek re-election in the 2017 General Election. He had been the Member of Parliament for Tatton since 2001 at which time he became the youngest Member of the House of Commons. In 2010 he became Chancellor of the Exchequer and we’ve listed together some of the more…

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General Election June 2017: Reaction

Prime Minister Theresa May shocked the nation to seek a General Election on 8th June. What was the political reaction to this? Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party “I welcome the PM’s decision to give the British people the chance to vote for a government that will put the interests of the majority first.”…

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The War on Terror has failed but Jeremy Corbyn’s foreign policy is incomplete by Nick Hoare

Following its suspension after the Manchester Arena bomb attack on the 22nd May, campaigning for the General Election has returned with a new sense of significance and an emphasis on security and foreign policy. The polls, having shown a strong if narrowing Conservative Party lead delivered a shock finding in the wake of the tragedy:…

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Scottish Conservatism: Stoking the Constitutional Fire by Jon Adamson

I attended one of the counts for the Scottish Parliamentary Elections in 2016 where, not uncommonly, I witnessed the Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP) holding onto one of their seats with a stable majority. However, what was not common that evening was seeing the Conservative candidate’s vote share increase so much that she leapt to second…

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The Battle for London: Goldsmith Vs Khan

by Lucy Mannion On the 5th of May candidates will be battling it out to become the next mayor of the big smoke. In all likelihood we will either see Labour’s Sadiq Khan or the Conservative’s Zac Goldsmith taking the baton from the visionary who took away bendy buses but gave us Boris bikes, BoJo…

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The European Union – My Case for ‘Better Off Out’

Making the case for leaving the EU I argue that we are losing our sovereignty, the right to govern ourselves and that there is no economic benefit to our membership of the EU that we could not gain if we were not a member. Do you know how much being in the EU costs? There…

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EU Referendum: Does the end justify the means? by Alexander Alley

We have burned a lot of bridges in getting our reform deal, however, is it worth it? Is the reform deal championed by our Prime Minister really that significant? Was this worth irritating the two largest powers on the continent? And why was it so difficult for Cameron to achieve stronger reforms? Context of our…

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The EU Referendum & the Likely Outcome by Alex Campbell

With the campaign raging about what leaving the European Union would look like, Alex Campbell writes for BRIT POLITICS about what it would mean if the UK votes to remain. Staying In & What Happens Next? In under a month, the UK will go to the polls to decide on Britain’s future relationship with the…

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Brexit and Northern Ireland: Our peace process is a fragile thing by Catherine Meenan

Having dominated the media headlines for 30 years of the ‘Troubles’, we don’t much hear about Northern Ireland anymore. In few places is this more apparent than the European referendum debate, despite the fact that Brexit could have the biggest impact there. There is a real threat that Brexit will impact both economic and, more…

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You have the right to remain silent… but this time you should vote by Angus Anderson

It’s been four years and it’s that time of year again, the polling card has been pushed through the letterbox, you are weighing up your options, evaluating candidates and sharpening the pencil that will accompany you into the voting booth. This is the chance you have been waiting for, on the 5th May you will…

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Ripe Opportunity Mired by a Tainted Political Legacy: The Scottish Conservative Party in 2016 by Patrick Logue

The Scottish political landscape may have changed irrevocably in the aftermath of the 2014 independence referendum but if there is one source of consistency in contemporary electioneering north of the border it is the seemingly terminal decline of the Conservative Party in Scotland. Whilst formerly safe seats in England and Wales have gradually returned to…

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Northern Ireland Assembly Elections: A Changing Landscape? by Ryan McCullough

Northern Ireland enters this summer’s election on its return from the edge of the abyss. Last autumn’s political crisis saw an acrimonious end to only the second full term at Stormont since 1998. Unionist parties were particularly outraged. The signing of the Fresh Start agreement in November has dealt with a lot of these issues,…

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What will this year’s Scottish Parliament elections mean for the Labour Party? by Kyra Gaunt

There are a variety of elections taking place around the UK in May 2016. As part of our series examining the big political issues at these elections Kyra Gaunt examines the likely impact of the Scottish parliament elections on the Labour Party. How do the Scottish Parliament elections work? On Thursday 5th May, the Scottish…

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George Osborne’s ‘sobering’ Treasury Report says people will be ‘permanently poorer’ if we leave the European Union.

The Chancellor and cabinet colleagues, Amber Rudd (Energy), Liz Truss (Environment) and Stephen Crabb (Work & Pensions), took to their podiums in an ensemble of serious blue garments to give us an equally serious and sobering look at what life in the UK will look like if we decide to leave the European Union (EU).…

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Are the upcoming English local elections the most significant so far this century? by Cllr Sam Armstrong

On May 5th this year, 128 local Authorities, 4 directly elected Mayors and 36 Police and Crime Commissioners throughout England are up for political gain. This chance for many of the English population to voice their opinion on how their local authorities are run should not be missed. For those hundreds of thousands of people…

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The SNP: Policies Delivered, or Returned to Sender? by Gavin Shepherd

The days have long since passed when the Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP) was the new kid on the block in Scottish politics. From a Minority Government in 2007, to the #2014IndyRef the SNP has seemed to be leaps and bounds ahead of its competitors. While the result of the referendum maintains the current devolution settlement…

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Is “Dodgy Dave” running out of luck?

David Cameron has always been luckier than most politicians. He became Leader of the Conservative Party when Tony Blair was on the wane. “You were the future once” he smugly reminded Blair at one of their early PMQs exchanges. Cameron went on to ride his luck at the 2010 general election against a Labour party…

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Time to think the unthinkable: Could Wales ditch Labour? by Andrew G Brown

The Welsh Assembly elections on the 5th May are going to be an anxious time for the main political parties in Wales. With pollsters predicting a reduction in the number of Labour AMs, it’s looking increasingly likely that we’ll see some form of coalition at the Senedd. We’ve had Labour-led coalitions before with Plaid and…

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Row erupts over Government’s £9m pro-EU leaflet

The Prime Minister has come under fire today after it emerged that £9.3 million of taxpayers money had been spent on a 16 page leaflet setting out the government’s position on why the UK should remain in the European Union. The leaflet titled “Why the Government believes that voting to remain in the European Union…

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Referendum on EU membership set for 23rd June

Following marathon talks in Brussels last night, British Prime Minister David Cameron, announced that a deal had been struck on reforms. The timetable would now see a Cabinet meeting held the following day, the first on a saturday since the Falklands War, to put forward a government recommendation. The Deal The Prime Minister has been…

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Why I’m standing to be a Member of Parliament by 23 year-old Sam Gould

At 23 I’m quite young to be standing to be an MP, in my hometown, Romford. Indeed it is not uncommon to hear “but you can’t be old enough to vote yourself!” on the doorstep. However, after the surprise of seeing a young person asking for their vote, the overwhelming reaction I get from people…

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My Election Night Predictions

A few days to go and we have all made it in one piece. Soon we will all know which if any of the masses of contradictory and inconsistent polls were right. I have spent the last twelve months carefully monitoring the polls, what the bookmakers have been saying, analysing intelligence on the ground in…

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The Unfortunate Diminishment of the Liberal Democrats by Cameron Lord

After the first leaders’ debate of the 2010 election campaign, “Cleggmania” swept the nation, and it seemed for a moment like the Liberal Democrats were poised to overturn Westminster’s long-established two-party hegemony. However, after five years in a coalition government their support has plummeted to around 8%, and the party is widely predicted to lose…

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Plaid Cymru: Potential Kingmaker or a false dawn? by Oliver Marks

The 2015 General Election is looking likely to be the closest in years giving smaller parties like Plaid Cymru an opportunity to influence the outcome. Here are my thoughts on their chances but first, a quick run through of the party itself. Who, what, when, where, how? Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925 and are…

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A tale of two manifesto launches: Could the Liberal Democrats and UKIP be more different

Today was the turn of the Liberal Democrats, in London, and UKIP in Essex to dazzle us with their manifesto launches. Lib Dems launch: attempt at funky Battersea ‘Live Lounge’ The Liberal Democrats were first up – a glossy colourful brochure and an intimate setting in Battersea with nightclub lighting. But why was the staging…

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GE2015: The NHS as a 2015 election issue by Nick Gregory

“No society can legitimately call itself civilised if a sick person is denied medical aid because of lack of means.” These are the words of Aneurin Bevan, the Minister for Health in Clement Attlee’s post-war Labour government and the driving force behind the creation of the NHS, which became a reality on 5 July 1948…

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Brighton Pavilion: Green and still surging by Tom Bailey

Within the long-term narrative of the 2015 general election, Brighton Pavilion is at once unique and emblematic. After the 1997 New Labour landslide, the constituency looked like becoming a Labour/Conservative marginal. But, emblematic of the country as a whole, the power of the two major parties has declined. Uniquely to Brighton Pavilion it is the…

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A New Marginal Seat: Boston and Skegness in 2015 and beyond by Callum Clark

UKIP have truly been the runaway success of the past two years. Nigel Farage has managed wall to wall media coverage and the party has boomed in the opinion polls, reaching up to 19 percentage points at the time Mark Reckless was re-elected as a UKIP MP in Rochester and Strood in November. The party…

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Labour’s Political Earthquake 70 Years Later: How might the 2015 General Election differ to 1945? by Alexander Rowe

The 1945 general election was the last to be fought on the back of a coalition government. However, this coalition government had been formed in light of Britain’s war interests in 1940, not a hung parliament. For me, the 1945 election proved to be the most important in British political history. Ultimately in a surprise…

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Why foreign policy needs more attention this election by Nicholas Barker

Foreign policy will not be a big issue this election. It will not be emphasised by the parties and voters will not demand any different. This is a problem because there are serious shortcomings in Britain’s approach to international affairs and our capacity to formulate and execute foreign policy. There is also insufficient public debate…

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The Great Immigration Debate by Jonathan Andrew

It is the issue that is fuelling perhaps the most impassioned and controversial debates of any other in the run-up to the General Election. Immigration. For many voters, this is the elephant in the room; the thing that the Westminster Elite in Parliament will not properly address but that ordinary people care deeply about. In…

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The SNP, “fringe” parties and the impending Westminster shake-up by Andrew MacAulay

Only months after a passionate and divisive Scottish independence debate, the constitutional future of the United Kingdom faces yet another stiff test in the weeks ahead. Apathy with the main ‘established’ parties and an independence movement in Scotland which looks unlikely to go away quietly anytime soon, points to the general election in May being…

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GE2015: The seven party TV debate where everyone and no-one won

Following last night’s Leaders debate today’s newspaper coverage is all over the place, as were predictably last night’s polls. Some say Cameron won, errrr what debate were you watching? Some, which I agree with, say Miliband won. Others think that Farage walked it and one pollster called it for Nicola Sturgeon by a pretty large…

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The Special Adviser – Dr Janet Mather, Manchester Metropolitan University

Janet Mather is a Principal Lecturer in Politics at Manchester Metropolitan University. Dr Mathers has had various publications including The European Union and British Democracy: towards convergence (Macmillan 2000): and Legitimating the EU: Aspirations, Inputs and Performance (Palgrave 2006). Janet is also the author of The Politics of Hunger: Why are so many sub-Saharan Africans…

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A Betrayal in Waiting? Plaid Cymru, the SNP and the Scottish Referendum by Professor Roger Scully

Roger Scully is Professor of Political Science in the Wales Governance Centre at Cardiff University. He has authored several books on political representation in Britain and Europe, including Wales Says Yes: Devolution and the 2011 Welsh Referendum (University of Wales Press, 2012). Read Roger’s Article The fortunes of the Scottish National Party (SNP) have surely never…

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The Theory of Post-War Consensus – Dr Timothy Heppell, University of Leeds

Dr Timothy Heppell is an Associate Professor of British Politics within the School of Politics and International Studies at Leeds University. Dr Timothy Heppell You can get more from Dr Heppell in his works The Tories: From Winston Churchill to David Cameron and Choosing the Labour Leader: Labour Party Leadership Elections from Wilson to…

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Could Cameron’s fate be decided in West Yorkshire

The Prime Minister could be set for an uncomfortable twelve months. Lord Ashcroft’s poll of a number of marginal seats shows an overall majority for Labour and UKIP are breathing down his neck in many key strongholds. The local election results are a snap shot of the public mood. They are real votes, in real…

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The Case for Membership of the European Union – Dr Ed Gouge

What is the problem here? Britain has been a member of the European Union for 42 years without anything terrible happening as a result of our membership. We have had a respectable rate of economic growth, better environmental protection and a few extra social rights and that is the most of it. Any problems with…

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The eight things you won’t see on May 22 – Local and European Elections 2014

One – Many Smiling Liberal Democrats Awful when people have been working hard for their communities; but the party’s face just doesn’t seem to fit right now. Two – Election Fraud Hopefully. The Electoral Commission is sending out watch-dogs to what it considers national hotspots. Three – Any Budging from the Tory Line They will…

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The end of Labour? The Collins Report and the Labour Party-Trade Union alliance by Dr David Stewart

Dr David Stewart is course leader for the BA History, BA Modern World History and BA History, Museums and Heritage programmes at the University of Central Lancashire. UCLan also offers joint degrees in History/Politics, Politics/Social Policy and Politics/Philosophy. Dr David Stewart David’s publications include The Path to Devolution and Change: A…

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‘Greener than thou?’ Party Supporters and the Environment in Britain – Dr Ben Clements, University of Leicester

Dr Ben Clements is Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Leicester. His areas of research include public opinion towards the EU and foreign policy issues; public opinion on environmental issues; the impact of religion on political behaviour and social attitudes in Britain; and religious issues in British politics. His recently-published…

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Evaluating David Cameron as Prime Minister by Professor Kevin Theakston, University of Leeds

Kevin Theakston is Professor of British Government at the School of Politics and International Studies at the University of Leeds and Head of School. Professor Kevin Theakston He is one of the leading experts on British Prime Ministers and on Churchill. He teaches the Prime Ministers and other modules on the…

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‘Reflections on Syria’ by Fabian Hamilton MP

It always seemed rather surreal when, in 2003, the newly installed President of Syria – Bashar al-Assad – told members of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee that he would have to address us formally in Arabic, because he was the Leader of a great Arab Nation. He spoke perfect English, so of course…

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