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Who is the Chancellor of the Exchequer?

The current Chancellor of the Exchequer is Rt Hon. Phillip Hammond MP. who was appointed in July 2016 He replaced George Osborne, the Conservative Member of Parliament for Tatton in Cheshire, England who held the position of Chancellor from the 2010 General Election.

What does the Chancellor do?

The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the government’s chief financial minister and is responsible for raising revenue through taxation or borrowing and for controlling public spending. He has overall responsibility for the work of the Treasury.

The Chancellor’s responsibilities cover:

• fiscal policy (including the presenting of the annual Budget)
• monetary policy, setting inflation targets
• ministerial arrangements (in his role as Second Lord of the Treasury)

About the current Chancellor of the Exchequer - Phillip Hammond

Phillip Hammond held the positions of Transport Secretary, Defence Secretary and Foreign Secretary in the Cameron Government. He was made Chancellor on the same day Theresa May took over as Prime Minister on 13 July 2016. He is a member of the Privy Counsel.

Mr Hammond has been an MP since 1997. He was elected Conservative MP for Runnymede and Weybridge.

He was born in Epping, Essex in 1955 and attended school in Brentwood before studying politics, philosophy and economics at University College, Oxford.

Prior to the Conservatives being in government in 2010, he held a number of shadow portfolios and before entering parliament had a business career in small and medium-sized companies in manufacturing, consultancy, property and construction, and oil and gas, both in the UK and abroad.

He is married with 3 children and lives in Send, Surrey.

About the former Chancellor of the Exchequer 2010 - July2016

George Osborne was born and educated in London, studying modern history at Oxford University.

George worked as Political Secretary to the Leader of the Opposition before being elected to Parliament. He entered Parliament as the youngest Conservative MP in the House of Commons.

After serving on the Public Accounts Committee and holding a number of shadow ministerial posts, he was appointed to the position of Shadow Chancellor in 2005, aged 33, where he served opposite Chancellors Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling until 2010.

In 2005 he successfully ran David Cameron’s campaign to become Leader of the Conservative Party. Following the 2010 Election he was part of the small Conservative negotiating team during the discussions that led to the formation of the Coalition Government. In May 2010 he became Chancellor of the Exchequer.

He was the youngest Chancellor to take office since Randolph Churchill in 1886.

Spotlight on Previous Chancellors of the Exchequer

Due to the importance of managing the countries money, this roles has been held by many people who then go on to be Prime Minister. These include Winston Churchill, William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli and in more recent years Sir John Major and Gordon Brown. In fact the very first Prime Minister Robert Walpole was Chancellor in 1715.

List of Chancellors of the Exchequer

20th & 21st centuries

• Alistair Darling -
 2007 to 2010

• Gordon Brown
 - 1997 to 2007

• Kenneth Clarke
 - 1993 to 1997

• Norman Lamont
 - 1990 to 1993

• John Major
 -1989 to 1990

• Nigel Lawson -
1983 to 1989

• Sir Geoffrey Howe -
1979 to 1983

• Denis Healey
 - 1974 to 1979

• Anthony Barber - 
1970 to 1974

• Ian Macleod
 - 1970

• Roy Jenkins
 - 1967 to 1970

• James Callaghan
 - 1964 to 1967

• Reginald Maudling - 
1962 to 1964

• Selwyn Lloyd - 
1960 to 1962

• Derick Heathcoat-Amory
 - 1958 to 1960

• Peter Thorneycroft - 
1957 to 1958

• Harold Macmillan - 
1955 to 1957

• Rab Butler
 - 1951 to 1955

• Hugh Gaitskell
 - 1950 to 1951

• Sir Stafford Cripps - 1947 to 1950

• Hugh Dalton - 
1945 to 1947

• Sir John Anderson
 - 1943 to 1945

• Sir Kingsley Wood - 
1940 to 1943

• Sir John Simon - 
1937 to 1940

• Neville Chamberlain - 
1931 to 1937

• Philip Snowden - 
1929 to 1931

• Winston Churchill - 1924 to 1929

• Philip Snowden
 - 1924

• Neville Chamberlain - 
1923 to 1924

• Stanley Baldwin - 
1922 to 1923

• Sir Robert Horne - 
1921 to 1922

• Austen Chamberlain
 - 1919 to 1922

• Bonar Law - 
1916 to 1919

• Reginald McKenna - 
1915 to 1916

• David Lloyd George - 
1908 to 1915

• H. H. Asquith - 
1905 to 1908

• Austen Chamberlain - 
1903 to 1905

• Charles Ritchie - 
1902 to 1903


19th century

•. Sir Michael Hicks Beach, Bt - 
1895 to 1902

•. Sir William Vernon Harcourt
 - 1892 to 1895

•. George Goschen - 
1887 to 1892

•. Lord Randolph Churchill - 
1886

•. Sir William Vernon Harcourt
 - 1886

•. Sir Michael Hicks Beach - 
1885 to 1886

•. Hugh Childers - 
1882 to 1885

•. William Gladstone
 - 1880 to 1882

•. Sir Stafford Henry Northcote - 
1874 to 1880

•. William Gladstone - 
1873 to 1874

•. Robert Lowe - 
1868 to 1873

•. George Ward Hunt - 
1868

•. Benjamin Disraeli - 
1866 to 1868

•. William Gladstone - 
1859 to 1866

•. Benjamin Disraeli
 - 1858 to 1859

•. Sir George Cornewall Lewis - 
1855 to 1858

•. William Gladstone
 - 1852 to 1855

•. Benjamin Disraeli
 - 1852

•. Sir Charles Wood
 - 1846 to 1852

•. Henry Goulburn
 - 1841 to 1846

•. Francis Baring
 - 1839 to 1841

•. Thomas Spring Rice
 - 1835 to 1839

•. Sir Robert Peel - 1834 to 1835

•. Viscount Althorp
 - 1830 to 1834

•. Henry Goulburn
 - 1828 to 1830

•. John Charles Herries - 
1827 to 1828

•. The Lord Tenterden
 - 1827

•. George Canning - 
1827

•. Hon. Frederick John Robinson - 
1823 to 1827

•. Nicholas Vansittart - 
1812 to 1823

•. Spender Perceval - 
1807 to 1812

•. Lord Henry Petty - 
1806 to 1807

•. William Pitt the Younger - 
1804 to 1806

•. Henry Addington
 - 1801 to 1804


18th century

•. William Pitt the Younger
 - 1783 to 1801

•. Lord John Cavendish
 - 1783

•. William Pitt the Younger - 
1782 to 1783

•. Lord North
 - 1767 to 1782

•. Charles Townshend - 
1766 to 1767

•. William Dowdeswell - 
1765 to 1766

•. George Grenville - 1763 to 1765

•. Sir Francis Dashwood - 
1762 to 1763

•. Viscount Barrington - 
1761 to 1762

•. Henry Bilson Legge
 - 1757 to 1761

•. Lord Mansfield - 
1757

•. Henry Bilson Legge - 
1756 to 1757

•. Sir George Lyttleton - 
1755 to 1756

•. Henry Bilson Legge - 
1754 to 1755

•. Sir William Lee - 
1754

•. Henry Pelham - 
1743 to 1754

•. Samuel Sandys - 
1742 to 1743

•. Sir Robert Walpole - 
1721 to 1742

•. Sir John Pratt - 
1721

•. John Aislabie - 
1718 to 1721

•. Viscount Stanhope - 
1717 to 1718

•. Robert Walpole
 - 1715 to 1717

•. Sir Richard Onslow
 - 1714 to 1715

•. Sir William Wyndhan - 
1713 to 1714

•. Robert Benson - 
1711 to 1713

•. Robert Harley - 
1710 to 1711

•. Sir John Smith - 
1708 to 1710

•. Henry Boyle
 - 1701 to 1708

16th & 17th centuries

•. Sir John Smith - 
1699 to 1701

•. Charles Montagu - 
1694 to 1699

•. Richard Hampden
 - 1690 to 1694

•. Henry Booth
 - 1689 to 1690

•. Sir John Ernle
 - 1676 to 1689

•. Sir John Duncombe - 
1672 to 1676

•. Lord Ashley - 
1661 to 1672

•. Sir Edward Hyde - 
1642 to 1646

•. Sir John Colepepper - 
1642 to 1643

•. Lord Cottington
 - 1629 to 1642

•. Lord Barrett
 - 1628 to 1629

•. Sir Richard Weston - 
1621 to 1628

•. Sir Fulke Greville
 - 1614 to 1621

•. Sir Julius Caesar - 
1604 to 1614

•. Earl of Dunbar
 - 1603 to 1606

•. Sir John Fortescue - 
1589 to 1603

•. Sir Walter Mildmay
 - 1566 to 1589

•. Sir Richard Sackville
 - 1559 to 1566